About your Search

20130416
20130424
STATION
CSPAN 3
CNBC 2
CSPAN2 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
promise to try it find it just for you right here on "mad money." i'm jim cramer and i will see you tomorrow. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." another day has passed but we have very few solid answers about the boston marathon bombing. we do now know what kind of devices were used. after that, the new information is few and far between. we are going to go to boston for a live update. >>> the stock markets had a very solid bounce back today after yesterday's big selloff. gold also had a positive day. but i believe the plunge in gold is a very good sign for the economy, just as it was in the '80s and '90s. in other words, some optimism. and senator marco rubio unveils the new immigration reform bill today. here's the key point. when we look at the benefits and score them dynamically, immigration reform will be a huge boost to the economy. "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> first up tonight, president obama will travel to boston thursday for an interfaith service with bombing victims. more than 24 hours after two bombs ripped through mar
about you. >> very lovely. >>> someone we also think is lovely, cbs sportscaster jim nantz who we like. he reportedly had an elaborate plan to deal with the blackout at this year's super bowl. most of the superdome went dark in the third quarter. remember that? according to "sports business journal" says nantz he wanted to jump from the broadcast booth, grab a ledge and lower himself into the stands. from there, he wanted to run onto the field and report what was going on. lance barrow who was producing for cbs thought better of the idea and kept nantz in his seat. >> they're probably going thank you, lance barrow. doubt me, don't. jim nantz. >>> live television can be shall we say, a dicey thing, especially when mistakes can last forever on the internet. ben tracy shows us a north dakota tv news anchor who's learning that lesson the hard way. >> reporter: first days on the job can be tough. this one was awful. >> [ bleep ] gay. >> good evening, i'm van tieu. >> a.j. clemente apparently unaware he was on the air swore as he got flustered practicing his lines for hi
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
credit but i think it pite have been jim o'neill of goldman saks saying that they don't govern enough. that the politics have to get better. does that ring true to you at all? >> do you know he what he might have said. >> it is true of india but let me add it is true of every country. we can't have better governance. i don't think you should generalize. there are many states in india where there is good 2k3w06 earnance. the central government generally provides good governance but there are weaknesses. we need to identify those weaknesses and rectify them. how can anyone say that we have reached the acme of governance. obviously governance can improve. we need to learn, for example, from the japanese or the chinese how to execute a project on time without a cost overrun. >> rose: right. >> if there is one thing that i would like to learn is how do execute a large project without a cost overrun or a time overrun. >> rose: so why do you have cost overruns or time overruns? >> because of, we, we tolerate inefficiencies. we don't punish people enough. we don't hold people accountable. it
30 victims who were missing a limb. abc's jim avila reports on how this tragedy unfolded. >> reporter: two hours after the winners crossed, 4:09 into the race, the amateur runners still filling boston's boylston street, two rapid-fire explosions at the finish line. >> something just blew up! [ explosion ] >> run! go! >> reporter: turning the cherished boston marathon into what one hospital official called a war zone. >> i crossed the 26-mile marker and i saw the first explosion happen. there was some commotion. i saw a fire and smoke. and i didn't know what it was. and then from about me to where that gentleman is standing over there, i literally saw the garbage barrel explode. i saw the flash, the fire, the smoke, and i just ran as fast as i could. >> reporter: cameras were rolling from many angles as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least within of the marathoners. look again. most of the injuries, though, suffered by spectators who came to celebrate the finish. >> a bomb went off. and it knocked me to the ground. and then, you know, everybody started running, panickin
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
in the united states senate joking or perhaps half joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spalding and the heritage foundation itself so very valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case for conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, and outspoken partisanship almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on pote sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend itself past gains -- its past gains from conservative reform. but megativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that lib
of estimates as asian demand for its software dropped. still, in an interview with cnbc earlier, co-ceo jim hagueman sounded confident that growth in the asia pacific region was still solid. >> in asia, we have had now 13 consecutive quarters of double digit growth. 12, actually. this is the first time we have an issue in asia. what that means is you have an organization that has been growing rapidly. with that comes new demand on leadership. we have been make something changes. in q1 we had a couple of key countries where we were looking for the leadership to take this organization to the next level. that's why it's impacting q1. but if i look at the pipeline and the business out there, we have a very, very solid business also in asia pacific. >> they also said revenue from sap's cloud technology division was a bright spot in the report, jumping 380% from a year earlier. he responded to speculation the company might make its cloud service private, as well. >> we do see what cloud does for our customers is it radically simplifies complexity. running global supply chains is not ease or realt
of the other questions have been asked. mouest -- yesterday in tntitellige had a briefing by jim clapper on thedg goingforwd. he produced a chart which basically showed, started with fy 2012 and show the effects of the various -- the first sequester and the ongoing sequester, the president's budget and other things that have affected that. it was a very powerful chart. i would ask of you could check with him, perhaps, chart number 11. visual a similar breakdown of what your budget thes like, including sequester on an ongoing basis. what does it do if we don't do anything about it? filed the suit for richelieu -- i found this information to be ry important. the munitions in the amount of funds available. the hobbled to see that data over the next 10 years, building in different places. look at the chart and you'll see what i am saying. >> we will. on thisther comment will sequester and budget. know this as well as i do. one of the first things you have to do in this situation is deferred maintenance. that is not saving. a cost someone will have to pay in the future. i am sure you agree. >
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)